Table of Contents: December 2005

fast forward
If you just can't wait to see what the future holds, you're not alone. Scientists, business leaders and even MIT researchers are pondering how the world will change and what it means for our lives, our businesses and, yes, our supply chains.
flying fish
The secret to shipping live lobsters, mussels or littlenecks isn't high-tech refrigeration equipment, says Legal Sea Foods. It's speed.
goodbye, tape measures
And so long, calculators. At Home Depot Supply's DCs, a sophisticated "dimensioning" system has brought storage operations into the 21st century.
urban renewal
Lagging productivity at its '50s-era DC in Columbus, Ohio, left retailer Big Lots with two choices: renovate the aging facility or shutter it and build a new high-tech facility somewhere else. Its decision may surprise you.
supply and command: interview with Gus Pagonis
He's moved ammo for the army, and he's moved dishwashers for Sears. But Gus Pagonis says that no matter what's in the trucks or on the ships, the same principles of logistics management apply.

Voices
Basic Training: don't forget manufacturing
The argument for integrating manufacturing with supply chain functions is compelling, whether the manufacturing source is across the street, across the country, or across the ocean. But whatever the situation, we cannot afford to simply let manufacturing "happen," figuring we'll deal with the consequences later.
Big Picture: getting it right
What we've learned in the last three years was that we were right about the challenges facing our readers, but that we underestimated how much tougher their jobs would soon become.
Fastlane: stake your claim
Today, everybody seems to be going global. Logistics people who once couldn't locate Zhongdian on a map suddenly find themselves arranging multimodal moves from the area. The result has been soaring demand for third-party international services.
Outbound: when all hell breaks loose
Even though logistics is essentially the engine that drives the economy, and even though the business of logistics represents a bigger chunk of the United States' gross domestic product than, say, the construction trade, it remains under the radar.When things go smoothly, no one even notices. But it's a very different story when things go wrong.
Rfidwatch: RFID: it's in the army now!
They still have plenty to worry about, but at least the GIs serving in Iraq no longer have to worry that when the rations arrive, they'll get a case of chicken stew when they ordered barbecued pork with rice.
Rfidwatch: the end of the raincheck?
If you've sworn off retail store shopping because the items you want never seem to be in stock, Wal-Mart says it's now safe to come back.
Inbound
what drivers want
Conventional wisdom holds that the key to retaining qualified truck drivers is higher wages.
opportunity knocks
Most businesses see state and federal regulations as burdensome and annoying.
will Christmas be blue ... or green?
Hurricanes, slumping consumer confidence and the prospect of rising energy prices may have dimmed retailers' optimism about this year's holiday selling season, but they're not giving up hope.
the incredible bulk
Conveyor equipment sales rose across the board in the first half of 2005, but once again, the growth was led by sales of bulk handling equipment.
fast and fresh
When volunteers at the Greater Chicago Food Depository unloaded the nearly 10 tons of fresh produce donated in October by the Chicago International Produce Market (CIPM), they found something unexpected in with the tomatoes, peaches and avocados: one new Toyota electric pallet truck.
Newsworthy
everyone's talking trucks
Insiders would have scoffed at the idea a few months back, but it appears that RFID technology, only recently the hottest topic in the industry, has been temporarily eclipsed.
IWLA: Looking for a few good candidates
The International Warehouse Logistics Association (IWLA) is looking for a new leader to replace Joel Hoiland, who will leave his post as the group's president and CEO at the end of this month.
drink up!
Japanese wine lovers who uncorked a bottle of the new vintage of Beaujolais Nouveau on Nov.
just don't forget to re-set your watch
Tired of the same old scenery during your daily commute? Maybe you'd prefer pedicabs and billboards emblazoned with Han characters.
oversight
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